TaskHuman provides support for all wellness dimensions, including spirituality. TaskHuman Provider, Robyn Augusta, recently sat down with fellow provider and TaskHuman Talks podcast host, Jamie Carroll, to discuss what spirituality means and why it is important.

The takeaways are the importance of connection and our own innate divinity.

Robyn doesn’t shy away from difficult questions. Here are the highlights of the conversation:

1. Intimate Connection Is a “Birthright”

Robyn does not hesitate to tell you that “Intimate connections to spirit is your birthright.” She feels that as humans we need to have connection in order to make meaning of our worlds.

We look for the connection in different places and in different people, but Robyn says we don’t have to. For her, our essence is our breath. If we connect to that, then we have the connectedness we seek.

“Something that we are seeking externally is really right there flowing through us every moment,” she says. 

We can find this connection to all people and things by turning to our breath. We find our divinity in our breath.

2. People Are Often Looking for Themselves.

As a spiritual provider, Robyn regularly works with clients who are looking for something. She approaches their journey with openness and curiosity, asking questions to find out who they are and what they want and need.

By asking questions, Robyn helps her clients understand themselves. When they can see themselves clearly, they know what they are looking for.

“Oftentimes, we have a long journey to come right back to ourselves,” she says.

3. Religion vs. Spirituality.

People like to categorize, so it’s no surprise that we do this with our spiritual wellness too. We claim we are “religious” or “spiritual.” Robyn reminds us that they are not mutually exclusive.

People try to make meaning out of life and religious texts do this. The texts respond to different human experiences: love, suffering, compassion, wrath, etc. Religion is the collection of these beliefs. And the Spirit is the breath. They often work in tandem.

How you describe yourself, as religious or spiritual or both; tell us your own story.

“Oftentimes, people, in their spiritual practices, they are very religious,” Robyn says. 

Being religious and being in nature can both fill us with awe.

4. How to Build a Spiritual Practice.

To start, ask yourself the same questions. Listen and allow your answers. This is not the time to try to censor yourself. The way you respond reveals who you are and what you want.

“Everybody begins where they are,” Robyn says. 

Once you realize where you are, you can look for someone to help you on your journey. You know what areas of yourself you want to explore.

5. The Pandemic Has Brought Suffering and Understanding.

Robyn sees that the loneliness of Covid has made people feel their suffering. It’s ok to feel the pain, but in our pain we can obtain a better understanding of ourselves.

“I’m not spiritualizing the human condition of suffering,” she says. 

She does underline that she’s not referring to general loneliness and suffering. If you are having true mental health events, you need to talk to a doctor or other professional right away.

Robyn encourages us to write our thoughts down. It allows us to “get it out,” which can help us see what is happening more clearly.

“Coming to the truth of what is actually going on,” she says, “and being there long enough to understand what the need and the desire is the first step.” 

She reminds us that our divinity and God have not left. There is still an opportunity to find it, even now.

6. Spiritual Wellness Through an App.

Prior to the pandemic, Robyn hadn’t considered virtual meetings as a viable option for her work. She felt the face-to-face element was critical. After joining TaskHuman as a provider, she quickly learned that she can give equal-to or better-than support through the app.

Because people can indicate what they want to talk about before meeting with her, it helps her narrow down her initial focus. She can ask them questions about their backgrounds that help them get to the root of themselves.

“I get an opportunity to learn a whole lot about them,” she says. “And then, help them live a life that would be in alignment with their values.” 

The virtual setting allows for growth.

7. Spiritual Self-Care Is Important.

Robyn believes breathwork is a critical part of self-care. She also makes sure she practices “non-linear movement.” This means she leaves her thoughts and focuses on her body. She tunes in to what her body is trying to tell her.

“The body is filled with wisdom,” Robyn says. 

When you allow yourself to feel your emotions and how they are moving through your body, you learn more about yourself. It also is a safe way to release anger, especially in our “anger-shaming society” Robyn thinks.

8. Breathwork Bonus.

Robyn leads a short breathwork exercise. To begin, get comfortable in your chair with your feet on the ground. Close your eyes and listen to Robyn lead you through the exercise.

Watch to the full podcast here. Connecting with a deity, your self, or even with your breath are all steps on your spiritual wellness journey. If you’re ready to explore your own divine creation further, connect 1-on-1 with Robyn live through the app today.